Scripties UMCG - Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
 
English | Nederlands

Does evening-type in symptomatic subjects predict a depressive and anxiety disorder diagnosisobserved after 2 and 4 years?

(2017) Druiven, S. (Stella)

Objectives:An individual‘s timing of sleep and conducting activities is called chronotype. Some individuals are morning-type (more active in the morning),others are intermediate-type or evening-type (more active in the evening). The role of chronotype in affective disorders has been implied before. In samples of patients suffering from a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder the majority of individuals was found to be evening-types rather than morning-types. We hypothesized evening-type in symptomatic subjects will also predict a future depressive and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis. We examined the cross-sectional association between evening-type and a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder, compared to a healthy control group. Next, we examined the longitudinal association between evening-type at baseline and a diagnosis of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at 2-year and 4-year follow-up. Methods:Baseline and 2- and 4-year follow-up (FU2, FU4, respectively) data from the longitudinal Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) study were used. At baseline, chronotype was determined with the use of the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ), and at baseline and all follow-ups current (1-month CIDI diagnosis) depressive (major depressive disorder or dysthymia) and/or anxiety disorder (panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, and social phobia) was determined. For the cross-sectional analysesa binomial logistic regression analysis was performed. Subjects at baseline with a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder (N=505) and healthy controls (N=426) were selected as outcome variable and chronotype (MSFsc) was the main predictor variable. To examine the individual disorders, the analyses were repeated with depressive disorder (N=116), anxiety disorder (N=238) and healthy controls (N=426) as outcome variables in a multinomial logistic regression analysis. For the longitudinal analyses,a binomial logistic regression analysis was used with the diagnosis of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at 2- and 4-year follow-up as outcome variables and chronotype (MSFsc) as main predictor variable. In the analyses possible confounding effects of age, gender, years of education, smoking status, employment, children in household, alcohol use, antidepressants use and benzodiazepines use at baseline were taken into account. Results: We found a cross-sectional association between evening-type and depressive and/or anxiety disorder (OR (95% CI) = 1.24 (1.05-1.46), p=0.010) compared to healthy controls. We also found this for evening-type and depressive disorder (OR (95% CI) = 1.49 (1.18-1.87), p=0.001) and anxiety disorder (OR (95% CI) = 1.25 (1.03-1.51), p=0.026). We did not find evening-type in a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder to be predictive for acurrent disorder diagnosis at 2-year or 4-year follow-up. In addition, no association was found for evening-type and a diagnosis of depressive disorder or anxiety disorder independently at 2-year or 4-year follow-up. Conclusion: The results of the cross-sectional analysis are in line with our hypothesis. However, our findings of the longitudinal analysis were not. Evening-type in symptomatic subjects is not predictive of a depressive and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis in 2 or 4 years.





ID 3560
Moeder ID 3463
Volgorde Druiven, S.
Naam DruivenS
Publiceren yes
OAI-naam Student_thesis
Path root/geneeskunde/2017/DruivenS/
Gemaakt op: 2017-08-28 13:29:14
Gemodificeerd op: 2017-08-28 13:29:14
Digitaal ID 59a41aaa8ab0a
Afstudeerrichting opleiding/afstudeerrichting 1
Studierichting Studierichting 1
Titel Does evening-type in symptomatic subjects predict a depressive and anxiety disorder diagnosisobserved after 2 and 4 years?
Ruilverkeer mogelijk no
Printen in opdracht no
Aantal pagina's 30
Publicatiejaar 2017
Taal en
Engelse samenvatting Objectives:An individual‘s timing of sleep and conducting activities is called chronotype. Some individuals are morning-type (more active in the morning),others are intermediate-type or evening-type (more active in the evening). The role of chronotype in affective disorders has been implied before. In samples of patients suffering from a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder the majority of individuals was found to be evening-types rather than morning-types. We hypothesized evening-type in symptomatic subjects will also predict a future depressive and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis. We examined the cross-sectional association between evening-type and a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder, compared to a healthy control group. Next, we examined the longitudinal association between evening-type at baseline and a diagnosis of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at 2-year and 4-year follow-up. Methods:Baseline and 2- and 4-year follow-up (FU2, FU4, respectively) data from the longitudinal Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) study were used. At baseline, chronotype was determined with the use of the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ), and at baseline and all follow-ups current (1-month CIDI diagnosis) depressive (major depressive disorder or dysthymia) and/or anxiety disorder (panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, and social phobia) was determined. For the cross-sectional analysesa binomial logistic regression analysis was performed. Subjects at baseline with a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder (N=505) and healthy controls (N=426) were selected as outcome variable and chronotype (MSFsc) was the main predictor variable. To examine the individual disorders, the analyses were repeated with depressive disorder (N=116), anxiety disorder (N=238) and healthy controls (N=426) as outcome variables in a multinomial logistic regression analysis. For the longitudinal analyses,a binomial logistic regression analysis was used with the diagnosis of depressive and/or anxiety disorder at 2- and 4-year follow-up as outcome variables and chronotype (MSFsc) as main predictor variable. In the analyses possible confounding effects of age, gender, years of education, smoking status, employment, children in household, alcohol use, antidepressants use and benzodiazepines use at baseline were taken into account. Results: We found a cross-sectional association between evening-type and depressive and/or anxiety disorder (OR (95% CI) = 1.24 (1.05-1.46), p=0.010) compared to healthy controls. We also found this for evening-type and depressive disorder (OR (95% CI) = 1.49 (1.18-1.87), p=0.001) and anxiety disorder (OR (95% CI) = 1.25 (1.03-1.51), p=0.026). We did not find evening-type in a current depressive and/or anxiety disorder to be predictive for acurrent disorder diagnosis at 2-year or 4-year follow-up. In addition, no association was found for evening-type and a diagnosis of depressive disorder or anxiety disorder independently at 2-year or 4-year follow-up. Conclusion: The results of the cross-sectional analysis are in line with our hypothesis. However, our findings of the longitudinal analysis were not. Evening-type in symptomatic subjects is not predictive of a depressive and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis in 2 or 4 years.
Nederlandse samenvatting niet aanwezig
Onderwijsinstelling Medical Sciences
Type embargo abstract openbaar, scriptie op aanvraag
Auteur(s) Druiven, S. (Stella)
UMCG begeleider(s) Faculty supervisor:; Meesters, dr. Ybe; Second supervisor:; Riese, dr. Harriette; Daily supervisor:; Knapen, Stefan; MD/PhD-student Dept. of Psychiatry, University Medical Centr
Auteur(s) Druiven, S. (Stella)
UMCG begeleider(s) Faculty supervisor:; Meesters, dr. Ybe; Second supervisor:; Riese, dr. Harriette; Daily supervisor:; Knapen, Stefan; MD, PhD-student Dept. of Psychiatry, University Medical Centr


 
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