Scripties UMCG - Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
 
English | Nederlands

Heeft BMI invloed op gastro-intestinale klachten bij patiënten met morbide obesitas, voorafgaand aan een bariatrische ingreep?

(2018) Bakker, L.I. (Liza)

Within three years after bariatric surgery, 15-30% patients will visit the ER, mostly because
of abdominal pain. Even before surgery, gastro-intestinal tract symptoms are frequent in
obese patients. Obesity seems to be a risk factor for gastro-intestinal tract symptoms
(abdominal pain, diarrhoea, bloating, reflux disease, irritable bowel syndrome). A rise in BMI
will result in an increased prevalence of diarrhoea and abdominal pain.
The effect of a higher BMI on the prevalence of gastro-intestinal tract symptoms,
gallbladder disease, obesity related comorbidities, irritable bowel disease and the effects of
irritable bowel disease on the frequency of stool have been measured in this research. Patients
with morbid obesity before primary bariatric surgery (n=219) have filled in a questionnaire.
These patients were classified into groups based on BMI. The results of patients with lower
BMI have been compared to the results of patients with a higher BMI.
A loss of appetite (p=0.048), a bloated feeling (p=0.014), hard stool (p=0.024) and
diarrhoea (p=0.020) are more prevalent in patients classified in the group with a lower BMI.
Patients classified in the group with a lower BMI also more often checked off all the needed
criteria for irritable bowel disease (p=0.048).
An increase in BMI did not result in an increased prevalence of gastro-intestinal tract
symptoms, gall bladder disease, obesity related comorbidities or irritable bowel syndrome.
Irritable bowel disease did not result in a change in frequency of stool in classified patients
with a higher BMI compared to classified patients with a lower BMI. Patients with morbid
obesity, classified in the group for a lower BMI, seem to have an increase in prevalence of
loss of appetite, bloated feeling, hard stool and diarrhoea. They also qualified more often to
the criteria for irritable bowel disease compared with classified patients with a higher BMI.






 
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